a blush of adrenaline
dailycapybara:

P1020765 by Kotaro Yokoyama on Flickr.
npr:

"For These Vegans, Masculinity Means Protecting The Planet" via Neda Ulaby
Image courtesy of James Koroni

This was a fun article

npr:

"For These Vegans, Masculinity Means Protecting The Planet" via Neda Ulaby

Image courtesy of James Koroni

This was a fun article

littlealienproducts:

Desert Garden: Southwest Lanscape // $65

npr:

What ‘The Golden Girls’ Taught Us About AIDS" via Barbara Fletcher

"But this is what The Golden Girls was so good at: bringing home those topics that often made people uncomfortable — racism, homosexuality, older female sexuality, sexual harassment, the homeless, addiction, marriage equality and more — and showing us how interconnected and utterly human we all are at any age. Served, of course, with that delicious trademark humor that infused the show throughout its groundbreaking, taboo-busting seven-season run.”

shortmom:

americanhighwayflower:

Despite all my rage I am still holding cats on a page

Then someone will say what is soft can never be bathed.


He looks like Dr. Evil

shortmom:

americanhighwayflower:

Despite all my rage I am still holding cats on a page

Then someone will say what is soft can never be bathed.

He looks like Dr. Evil

anrgy:

inspirational

anrgy:

inspirational

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

cirque-du-sirene:

Ruckus rockin out to a good jam

cirque-du-sirene:

Ruckus rockin out to a good jam

dilfgod:

you’re home early

dilfgod:

you’re home early